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Friday, May 08, 2009

Regarding the South Hills wind towers

With the vast potential Idaho has for utilizing wind power, I would be interested in learning more about how the bird-diverters work. Many of the powerful interest blowhards, who speak out against wind power, amplify bird deaths and because of this, say that wind should be out of the question; instead of remarking, “Hey, wind is simply a great idea! Why can’t we inject more research and development into ways to prevent bird windmill casualties?”

Last year Popular Science Magazine featured an award-winning invention that employed wind power from Ginormous rubber bands. If developed further, such devices could help our country emerge from the current economic and energy Dark Ages. While inventions like this hold great possibility for our future, naysayers will probably find ways to claim that whippoorwills and hummingbirds will be fatally attracted to the buzzing sound.

Before our country started becoming a lazy fast food TV nation, we held our inventors in higher esteem. While the next generation of Tesla’s Edison’s, Kamen’s, Hurtibise’s and Farthsworth emerge, we should give these ingenious energy saviors more enthusiastic support, instead of sticking our heads in South Idaho sand to avoid wind.

http://www.magicvalley.com/articles/2009/05/12/opinion/letters/161621_119.txt

http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/content/article/2009/04/23/AR2009042303809.html


1 comment:

Boldly Serving Up Wheat Grass said...

Surely the American poultry industry salughters vastly more birds than the wind power industry ever could. Therefore, unless these anti-wind-power people are also actively protesting the much larger avian threat of industrialized poultry production, their anti-wind-power protests are by definition disingenuous.

Interestingly, though, I'm a vegetarian, yet also strongly in favor of wind power. I don't think we're giving the birds enough credit here. They're crafty creatures -- especially the crows. I bet a crow never died yet in at power generation station. In short order, the other birds will surely learn to avoid the dreaded turbine blades. And that's my own unscientific, uninformed opinion on the matter.