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Thursday, May 12, 2016

Read your Friggin’ Bible, she demanded!

Hitting a rough patch lately, I traveled down to the Hunger Coalition to ask for some food. It was crowded as the administrators had thoughtfully added a free dog vaccination service for the community that same day. I had been lucky to find a good parking spot for my big rig, and after checking in at the desk, started milling around outside the bustling waiting room on that nice afternoon.

As one food recipient began exiting with his vehicle from the front row, two cars suddenly started vying for his prime parking spot. Since he pulled out to the right, this gave a woman approaching from the left an advantage to grab the spot; and as she had a handicapped placard displayed in her window this seemed like a natural fit to the outside observers. However, her spot-snagging immediately triggered anger with the motorist on the right and that wiry woman started aggressively honking her horn and flipping the bird toward the handicapped parking woman. Not only that, but in this swift scene the angry woman decided to block someone else in, and then quickly emerged from her rig to confront the handicapped woman.
The troubled woman sprinted up to the window of the handicapped woman and started shouting surreally, “You know that man was saving that spot from me! And you took it! READ YOUR BIBLE! READ YOUR FRICKIN’ BIBLE!!

This about did it for me. I read newspapers, and had inkling that this is about when bullets sometimes start whizzing, so I slipped into the waiting room. But then half of me was compelled to check out the wiry woman, so I eased back out and starting analyzing her.  Immediately after the thumping bible encounter the poor woman directed her intensity to a young man whose small dog had pooped tiny droplets in the mulch-bed. “Do you mind going to your car and getting a plastic bag to clean up your filth? I’ll watch your dog!” and then she grabbed his leash and stole his seat. Then she started boisterously passive-aggressively exclaiming: Oh, this dog is my favorite kind; I really like him!

At this juncture, I thought of grabbing my recently published article “Merge right with kindness” of the dashboard of my work-rig and tucking it into her car (which was still blocking in some other poor soul). Then I reconsidered because I felt that prophet-sizing kindness there would likely only piss her off even more and wondering who else she might have heatedly confronted that afternoon I didn’t want to be next.
So here breaks the fourth wall: Since Abner N. remarked that he wouldn’t read my whimsical “Merge Right with Kindness” article until I weaved it properly into this tale; his goading me to become a better writer leads me this rejection letter from a modified version of the ‘merge’ story (which I had been desiring to slip into the nasty bible lady’s window):

We received your guest opinion submission and it was reviewed by Robert Ehlert, Editorial Page Editor. However, it was not accepted for publication. We simply receive more guest opinion submissions than can possibly be accepted for publication. And with the Legislature just ending and a presidential election year, we are extremely backlogged right now.

If you have any questions, you need to contact Robert Ehlert directly at 377-6437 or email rehlert@idahostatesman.com.

Thank you,

Peggy Calhoun
News Assistant
Idaho Statesman

On Wed, Apr 6, 2016 at 10:43 PM, <smavo@cox.net> wrote:


Merge right with kindness

Our sturdy work crew witnessed some disconcerting scenes recently during the commute where traffic quickly comes together by the bridge under construction near the Ketchum hospital. After seeing one ill-mannered incident that looked like it could lead to an altercation one of my guys said, “In situations like these, I just try to focus on good intentions for the troubled people involved,” as he motioned with some blessing gestures.

*
Then, another colleague clicked on Wikipedia and spoke aloud: “Kindness is a behavior marked by ethical characteristics, a pleasant disposition, and concern for others. It is known as a virtue, and recognized as a value in many cultures and religions.”

*

Our anchor man observed with thoughtful intensity: “Some people are just having an awful day and everybody is allowed that. However, some poor folks are experiencing a series of really bad days; think about some of your own worst days. And getting behind the wheel of a vehicle may be the one thing that temporarily gives some people a powerful sense of freedom and control, while many other aspects of their life are in shambles.”

*


Which drives me back to the blessing gestures: When motorists merge, it would bring better understanding if more were to reflect on what their most highly revered spiritual figure would do to create a better convergence at our future community bridge.

*


And with this harmonic jazz in mind; as they’ve done well to lessen dangerous conditions for other large mammals, perhaps our Idaho Transportation Department could develop a contest for aspiring graphic artists to come up with an icon to be displayed on new “Merge right with kindness” road signs.

*


Our quixotic high-hope for this persuasive art to work is that some impolite motorists will shift their behavior over from nasty bird-flipping, and upgrade to sturdy peace signs playfully shared with two nice fingers.




Monday, May 09, 2016

Thankful for “relatively harmless” results of airport deicing study


It was inspiring to read the recent Express report “Runway deicer isn’t polluting land around airport” and I’m grateful that the airport authority went to the trouble of conducting the suggested feasibility tests. Moreover, we all should be appreciative for the amazing magic dissolution abilities that water simply has for healing misplaced poisons of Mother Earth - especially with this recent season of 110% normal precipitation helping with great assist.



However; beneath the surface and before this issue gets too quickly brushed aside, I wonder if the residents who live in close proximity to the airport such as those on Broadford Highlands are completely comfortable with the results of this test, which did include some ambiguous statements. After all, most of the houses there were constructed in the era when the more toxic ethylene glycol was being rigorously and copiously applied as a deicing agent to help our local aircraft fly.




I believe that the majority of Broadford Highland residents care about their friends and family and they wouldn’t want to offer any friend a drink of questionable water. So I wonder if a few of the residents there were to ask the Friedman Airport Authority to extend their already comprehensive study to a just a few more wells in their neighborhood and then my intuitive suspicions about poor water quality in that area were proven to be unfounded, then we all might rest a little easier on this important healthy issue. 

Sunday, April 17, 2016

Cut off your nose or spite your Facebook?
(Sense of smell is important)

I read with great interest about a qualitative study which indicates that given a hypothetical choice, a majority of today’s youth would prefer to give up their sense of smell rather than live without their social networks.
I’m curious as to how this poll was conducted because instead of giving an instant response to such a significant dilemma, this strikes me as the type of quandary, albeit theoretical, that one should mull over wisely a few days before giving a final answer.
Take, for instance, the importance of being able to smell a fire or gas leak before it builds into an explosive nature. And what about spoiled food, with our smart noses ready to save us from sickness and worse? If we went insensibly snout-less, wouldn’t most of us miss the simple pleasures and familiarity of distinctive aromas and perfumes emanating from friends and beloved ones?
Smell is the sense most closely intertwined with our memories. When we take a healthy walk through the mountainous woods on a vibrant snowy evening feeling powerfully connected to nature, it’s a nostalgic joy to breathe in somebody’s fireplace blazing in the misty distance, which reminds us sweetly of other golden days.
With this in mind, I wonder if more of today’s youth reflected on this, would they truly give up their good sense of smell and prefer to paint rosy Facebook pictures. Perhaps I’m a nosy Luddite, but I sense something sour when I see many of our youth believing social networks are the greatest thing invented since the fresh fragrance of warm sliced bread.


Thursday, March 31, 2016

Merge right with kindness


Our sturdy work crew recently witnessed some disconcerting scenes during the commute where traffic quickly comes together by the bridge near the Ketchum hospital. After seeing one ill-mannered incident that looked like it could lead to an altercation one of my guys said, “In situations like these, I just try to focus on good intentions for the troubled people involved,” as he motioned with some blessing gestures.


Then, another worker clicked on Wikipedia and spoke aloud: “Kindness is a behavior marked by ethical characteristics, a pleasant disposition, and concern for others. It is known as a virtue, and recognized as a value in many cultures and religions.”


Our anchor man observed with thoughtful intensity: Some people are just having an awful day and everybody is allowed that. However, some poor folks are experiencing a series of really bad days; think about some of your own worst days. And getting behind the wheel of a vehicle may be the one thing that temporarily gives some people a powerful sense of freedom and control, while many other aspects of their life is in shambles.
Which drives me back to the blessing gestures: When motorists merge, it would bring better understanding if more were to reflect on what their most highly revered spiritual figure would do to construct a better convergence at our future community bridge.


And with this harmonic jazz in mind; as they’ve done well to lessen dangerous conditions for other large mammals, perhaps our Idaho Transportation Department could develop a contest for aspiring graphic artists to come up with an icon to be displayed on new “Merge right with kindness” road signs.


Our high-hope for this persuasive art to work is that some impolite motorists will shift their nasty behavior over from bird-flipping and upgrade to sturdy peace signs shared with two nice fingers. 





Saturday, March 19, 2016

Merge right with kindness

Our work crew witnessed some disconcerting scenes lately during the commute where traffic quickly comes together by the bridge near the hospital. After seeing one ill-mannered incident that looked like it could lead to an altercation one of my guys said, “In situations like these, I just try to focus on good intentions for the troubled people involved,” as he motioned with some blessing gestures. 


Then, another worker clicked on Wikipedia and spoke aloud: “Kindness is a behavior marked by ethical characteristics, a pleasant disposition, and concern for others. It is known as a virtue, and recognized as a value in many cultures and religions.”


Our anchor man observed with intensity: Some people are just having an awful day and everybody is allowed that. However, some poor folks are experiencing a series of really bad days; think about some of your own worst days. And getting behind the wheel of a vehicle may be the one thing that temporarily gives some people a powerful sense of control and freedom, while many other aspects of their life is in shambles.
Which drives me back to the blessing gestures: When motorists merge, it would bring better understanding if more were to reflect on what their most highly revered spiritual figure would do to create a better convergence at our future community bridge.


With this harmonic jazz in mind; as they’ve done well to lessen dangerous conditions for other large mammals, perhaps the Idaho Transportation Department could develop a contest for aspiring graphic artists to come up with an icon to be persuasively displayed with new “Merge right with kindness” road signs.



And the high-hope for this to work is that some impolite motorists will upgrade their behavior from nasty bird-flipping, over to peace signs with two nice fingers. 

Friday, March 18, 2016

Re: What is your first Internet Experience?

Postby Schmazo » Thu Mar 17, 2016 11:03 pm
Around twenty autumns ago, before I even had a clue about what surfing the Internets is, my friend 3V3T2 who is a computer guru snapped a few photos of me while I was donning a six-foot long blond wig while sipping beer next to a campfire. (I'm a large man.)

I had purchased the blond wig earlier that week at a local thrift store for 3 bucks, and with Halloween soon approaching I thought owning it held potential for a some good laughs or a prank.

A few months later, in the middle of winter 3V3T2 invited me into his office to watch some football playoffs. While there, he booted his computer up and during halftime exclaimed, "Schmazo, you really need to check out this website."

It was a site called something like "Am I a hottie or not?" and as we scrolled through the photos you could see a variety of profile pictures. They had women's and men's categories and you could vote on each photo by clicking anywhere from 1 to 10.

I looked at the women featured for a few minutes. There were some good looking women, but since it was a new invention it appeared that the limited amount of random photos would repeat themselves after a few minutes.

Meanwhile, the second half of the Redskins game was starting and I started to turn from the computer to the television programme, but 3V3T2 persuasively insisted that I keep looking at the photos, because there was this really great looking chick who hadn't come up yet that I would enjoy seeing.

And then it happened: I sat there stunned seeing a photo of myself wearing that blond wig by the campfire on the World Wide Web for all to see! On top of that he had listed me in the Women's category, and with the compilation of votes I was rated as a mere "2."

I glared at Steve in the mirror laughing at me, and I do remember laughing a bit at myself as well: but mostly I remember exclaiming, "THANKS FOR PUTTING MY PICTURE ON THE INTERNET, DICK!" :shock2:

For a few weeks after that trying to be a good sport, I went into his office sometimes to see what my rating had gained on the world hottie circuit. Then, I found that I could vote for myself and experimented with giving myself some tens. But this never seemed to raise the rating much.

After a few weeks I figured out that instead of waiting for my profile photo to come up randomly, I could cheat by clicking the back button and then vote for myself quickly again with another 10. But even with that effort, I never could raise my rating above 2.9. Seems other forces of judging beauty were against me. :lol2:

~ ~ ~ ~ ~

Luckily, my photo now seems to have been expunged from the permanent record. I've looked around a few times in depth too, but can't seem to find me:


https://www.google.com/search?q=TALL+ME ... 24&bih=653

Wednesday, March 16, 2016

Merge right with kindness

Our work crew witnessed some disconcerting scenes lately during the commute where traffic quickly comes together by the bridge near the Ketchum hospital. After seeing one ill-mannered incident that looked like it could lead to an altercation one of my guys said, “In situations like these, I just try to focus on good intentions for the troubled people involved,” as he motioned with some blessing gestures. 


Then, another worker clicked on Wikipedia and spoke aloud: “Kindness is a behavior marked by ethical characteristics, a pleasant disposition, and concern for others. It is known as a virtue, and recognized as a value in many cultures and religions.”

Our anchor man observed with intensity: Some people are just having an awful day and everybody is allowed that. However, some poor folks are experiencing a series of really bad days; think about some of your own worst days. And getting behind the wheel of a vehicle may be the one thing that temporarily gives some people a powerful sense of control and freedom, while many other aspects of their life is in shambles.
Which drives me back to the blessing gestures: When motorists merge, it would bring better understanding if more were to reflect on what their most highly revered spiritual figure would do to create a better convergence at our future community bridge.


And with this harmonic jazz in mind, as they’ve done successfully for other large mammals; perhaps the Idaho Transportation Department could develop a contest for aspiring graphic artists to come up with an icon to be persuasively displayed with new “Merge right with kindness” road signs.

Sunday, March 13, 2016

Merge on the bridge to kindness

Our work crew witnessed some disconcerting scenes lately during the commute where traffic quickly comes together by the bridge near the hospital. After seeing one ill-mannered incident that looked like it could lead to an altercation one of my guys said, “In situations like these, I just try to focus on good intentions for the troubled people involved,” as he motioned with some blessing gestures.

Then, another worker clicked on Wikipedia and spoke aloud: “Kindness is a behavior marked by ethical characteristics, a pleasant disposition, and concern for others. It is known as a virtue, and recognized as a value in many cultures and religions.”

Our anchor man observed with intensity: Some people are just having an awful day and everybody is allowed that. However, some folks are experiencing a series of really bad days; think about some of your own worst days. And getting behind the wheel of a vehicle may be the one thing that temporarily gives some people a powerful sense of control and freedom, while many other aspects of their life is in shambles.


Which drives me back to the blessing gestures: When motorists merge, it would bring better understanding if more were to reflect on what their most highly admired spiritual figure would do to create a better convergence at our future community bridge.


And with this harmonic jazz in mind, as they’ve done successfully with other large mammals; perhaps the Idaho Transportation Department could develop a contest for aspiring graphic artists to come up with an icon to be persuasively displayed with new “Merge right with kindness” road signs.

Sunday, February 07, 2016

 More misplaced poisons of Mother Earth

It’s been inspiring to read the recent letters of ecological concern by Eloise Christensen and Kerrin McCall regarding cleaner snow removal policies. Their letters remind me of a similar concern for the soil at Friedman Memorial Airport, which has been thoroughly contaminated through decades of aircraft deicing.

With the large budget that our Hailey airport has, it would be nice to see board members consider a feasibility study along the lines of a large indoor heated de-icing structure for aircraft to taxi through before flying off. Such an arrangement could be designed with environmentally friendly drains for collecting the used de-icing fluid, and then cleaning and recycling it.

Another potential improvisation to remove dangerous ice would be by beaming aircraft with modernized microwave systems. Constructing a heated hanger for airplanes to pass through shortly before takeoff would lessen the amount of de-icing fluid or microwaves required. In summer, the de-icing booth could even be designed to double as an aircraft wash bay, where frequent engine cleanses would contribute to improved airplane fuel efficiency.


Meanwhile, our thoughtful community should look forward to the ongoing proactive research and letters of public interest from Eloise and Kerrin. After all, we would be less polluted as people if more folks cared about our fragile environment as much they do. 

Friday, February 05, 2016

Misplaced poisons of Mother Earth

It’s been inspiring to read the recent letters of ecological concern by Eloise Christensen and Kerrin McCall regarding cleaner snow removal policies. Their letters remind me of a similar concern for the soil at Friedman Memorial Airport, which has been contaminated through decades of aircraft deicing.

With the large budget that our Hailey airport has, it would be nice to see board members consider a feasibility study along the lines of large heated indoor de-icing structure for aircraft to taxi through before flying off. Such an arrangement could be designed with environmentally friendly drains for collecting the used de-icing fluid, and then cleaning and recycling it.

Another potential improvisation would be to remove dangerous ice by beaming aircraft with modernized microwave systems. Building a heated hanger for airplanes to pass through shortly before takeoff would lessen the amount of de-icing fluid or microwaves required. In summer, the de-icing booth could even be designed to double as an aircraft wash bay.


Meanwhile, our community should look forward to the ongoing proactive research from Eloise and Kerrin. After all, we would be less polluted as people if more folks cared about the proper handling of misplaced poisons from good Mother Earth as much they do. 

Wednesday, September 23, 2015

The Rock
(from Pale Rider)

I know about where it is 
this big rock with a 
candy vein of gold in it 
scintillating under the stars
*
I want to find this Idaho Sword of Shannara 
and lay me down under the silver fruit 
Press the gold of my ear to the vibration 
to sense if I can detect the echo of 
when Lurch -or was it Jaws? 
Split this baby in half 
with an old 1863 hickory stick sledgehammer
*
Yepperdoodle 
I’ll bend up over the hill tonite 
a-foot 
too itchy and scratchy for a truck in that rough spot 
to see if I can’t see how these hills have changed
*
Yeah that’s it 
I’ll pack up the DVD player 
better bring a spare battery juice-pack 
Cause it’s cold in those Idaho hills 
I’ll freeze frame on the DVD 
sections of Mountains in that backdrop 
and compare it to our current status
*
I think of the nameless preacher in the movie 
and for some reason the Beatles real nowhere man 
jangles my juices like Satchel Paige on opening day
*

On spectacular evenings like these 
Sometimes it feels like we’ll still be standing strong 
long after these hills have fast eroded away

Monday, September 21, 2015

Lower speed limit was safer

After nearly being side-swiped by a cement truck barreling unbalanced down Highway 75 in a recent rainstorm, I thought about how the speed limit for this widened stretch is being raised and considered this teetering ‘near-miss’ a bad omen.

Equally unsettling were the reactions of two motorists who decided to speed up and buzz by the hydroplaning truck as it overcorrected, and then almost toppled over on them as they passed in the slick right lane. I suspect that these law-bending speeders are part of the majority who were ignoring the limits anyway; which is a major reason why the Idaho Transportation Department decided give up on its prudent attempt to keep the speed lower and us safer.

The area near the hospital is well known as an active wildlife corridor, and raising the limit there goes against the grain of an insightful WRHS applied physics class study on the effects of vehicle collisions with wildlife at 45 mph versus 55 mph.


Moreover, motorists turning left into traffic now need to cross over an additional lane before merging.


Sadly, it's easy to predict that bad vehicle crashes will likely increase when the highway soon turns icy and numerous motorists continue to show a lack of respect toward the speed limit. And since Idaho is a state without annual vehicle safety inspections for tires brakes and steering systems some of the same people who pay little heed to basic traffic rules on treacherous roads probably will be piloting vehicles that are not even roadworthy for new season. 

Thursday, September 03, 2015




Transporting this symbolic hydrant to the Animal Shelter new office reminded me of my Falls Church Water days: One cold winter night while on call, someone had driven their sedan around a corner too fast, slipped on the ice and knocked over a hydrant so it was spurting water into the sky just like in the movies. Luckily, I arrived quick enough to locate the shut-off valve before it froze over; but after I turned it off, the strange thing was, was that nobody was around.
The vehicle was wedged over the hydrant, and inspecting the scene closer, it appeared as though they had tried to drive away, but could not get it unhooked from the spouting hydrant. I wondered if they had been met by an ambulance, but then a police officer came by and said that that was not the case. We saw quite a few beer cans crushed in the back seat, and later I learned that the owner of the car called the police a few hours later to report his car stolen. The police invited him down to fill out a report in person; but apparently he never showed - probably in fear of being criminally charged with filling out a false police report.

Never did learn how the owner finally got his damaged car back, or if he ever did.

Sunday, July 19, 2015

 A far out Plutonian Ode

It’s practically beyond belief to see the initial photographsof Pluto we’ve received through the 12-watt transmitter of NASA’s New Horizons spacecraft from 3 billion miles away. Stunning high resolutions of icy mountains as tall as Hyndman and a toy box full of planetary mysteries for sunny mission astronomers to gleefully analyze in coming years – and this success merely 112 years after the Wright Brothers.


Meanwhile, here on solid Earth, most people have forgotten the protests over the 24 pounds of Idaho made plutonium that’s powering this extraordinary mission. According to the January 16, 2006 N.Y. Times: “NASA and the U.S. Department of Energy put the probability of an early-launch accident that would cause plutonium to be released at 1 in 350 chances.”


The Times also reported in 2006 that NASA estimated the cost of decontamination, should there be a serious accident with plutonium released during the launch, at anywhere from $241 million to $1.3 billion per square mile, depending on the size of the area.
 This is not a farfetched scenario. Of the 28 U.S. space missions that used plutonium preceding 2006, three had accidents, the worst in 1964 in which a plutonium-powered satellite broke up and spread toxic radioactivity wide over our planet.
Interestingly, soon after the European Space Agency begin using solar energy to power spacecraft past Jupiter, NASA retracted its earlier claims that plutonium would be needed for spacecraft to be operational beyond Mars and admitted that solar will work in deep space. Naturally, this affects the future of the highly profitable market of INL plutonium production.
Recently, I read an interesting article that speculated about the increasing speeds we will likely achieve in future space travel. The author suggested that within a few generations, we may develop probes capable of reaching the Outer Oort Belt within a few days. Not only that, but we could even possess the capability of capturing an earlier probe and then retrieving it for education purposes to a contemporary space museum.
If humanity achieves this great ability in another 112 years, I would beseech future generations that they do not return the New Horizons spacecraft full of deadly plutonium to a museum back on delicate Earth, but rather create a safe outpost museum on faraway Pluto. This would also make a perfectly fitting final resting place for some of Clyde Tombaugh's ashes, which are aboard that very spacecraft, as he was the original 
discoverer of Pluto. 

And if you’ve read his book Plutonian Ode in which leading Beat Poet Alan Ginsberg protested broadly about this most deadly element under the sun, I think you’ll agree that he probably would have smiled at this pie-in-the-sky idea. 

Saturday, July 18, 2015

Ode to a Plutonian Ode

It’s practically beyond belief to see the initial stunning photographs of Pluto we’ve received through the 12-watt transmitter of NASA’s New Horizons spacecraft, 3 billion miles away. High resolutions of icy mountains as tall as Hyndman and a toy box full of planetary mysteries for mission astronomers to gleefully analyze in coming years – and this success merely 112 years after the Wright Brothers.

*
Meanwhile, here on solid Earth, most people have forgotten the protests over the 24 pounds of Idaho made plutonium that’s powering this extraordinary mission. According to the January 16, 2006 N.Y Times: “NASA and the U.S. Department of Energy put the probability of an early-launch accident that would cause plutonium to be released at 1 in 350 chances.”

*
The Times also reported in 2006 that NASA estimated the cost of decontamination, should there be a serious accident with plutonium released during the launch, at anywhere from $241 million to $1.3 billion per square mile, depending on the size of the area.
*
 This is not a farfetched scenario. Of 28 U.S. space missions that used plutonium preceding 2006, three have had accidents, the worst in 1964 in which a plutonium-powered satellite broke up and spread toxic radioactivity wide over our planet.
Interestingly, soon after the European Space Agency begin using solar energy to power spacecraft past Jupiter, NASA retracted its earlier claims that plutonium would be needed for spacecraft to be operational beyond Mars and admitted that solar will work in deep space. This of course, affects the future of the highly profitable market of INL plutonium production.
*
Recently, I read an interesting article that speculated about the increasing speeds we will probably achieve in future space travel. The author suggested that within a few generations, we may very well develop probes capable of reaching the Outer Oort Belt within a few days. Not only that, but we could even possess the capability of capturing an earlier probe and then retrieving it for education purposes to a contemporary space museum.
*
If humanity achieves this ability in another 112 years, I would suggest to future generations that they do not return the New Horizons spacecraft full of deadly plutonium back to a museum on fragile Earth, but rather create a safe outpost museum on faraway Pluto.
*

And if you’ve read his book Plutonian Ode in which leading Beat Poet Alan Ginsberg spoke broadly about this most deadly element under the sun, I think you’ll agree he probably would have smiled at the idea. 

Sunday, April 12, 2015



Home I leave to embark on a journey for ten days, where I meet a friend on his island. 


We paddle our canoe to an uninhabited island, where we bow-hunt, shooting a sea lion.


After another ten days we return home.

Sunday, March 08, 2015

Impressed by Creative crossword clue




  I often enjoy solving clues in the Times-News laid out by prolific puzzler Jacqueline E. Mathews. Sometimes I’m nearing completion, and then with a little help from my friends we crack the whole thing. Last summer on a work break, Noah and I discovered a unique mind-bender; the clue for 54 across was: “Adam didn’t have one, if you think about it.” We needed five letters across, but checking the down clues, we had unraveled only one; which indicated the middle letter should be “V.”


We returned to work, placing the puzzle aside and though we picked it up later, couldn't for the life of us figure out what Adam was missing. A good wife? Some ribs? Snake repellent?  In the evening after mulling the clues more, the answer came in a flash. Adam didn't have a NAVEL – if you think about it! I called Noah and he was equally tickled with Adam’s belly button. Then, with the gift of Google we researched paintings of Adam from antiquity and realized that dozens of ancient painters had not considered it either, because smack dab next to Adams rib was residual evidence of his umbilical cord leading to a larger Great Mystery. 

Saturday, March 07, 2015

Impressed by creative crossword clue



  I often enjoy solving clues in the Times-News laid out by prolific puzzler Jacqueline Mathews. Sometimes I’m near completion, and then with a little help from my friends we crack the whole thing. Last summer on a break from work, Noah and I discovered a unique mind-bender; the clue for 54 across was: “Adam didn’t have one, if you think about it.” We needed five letters across, but checking the down clues, we had only unraveled one; which indicated the middle letter for our answer would be “V.”



We returned to work, placing the puzzle aside and though we kept picking it up later, couldn’t figure out what Adam was missing. A good wife? Some ribs? Snake repellant?  In the evening after mulling over the clues more, Eureka! I answered it. Adam didn’t have a navel – if you think about it! I called Noah and he was equally tickled about Adam’s belly button. Then, with the gift of Google we researched paintings of Adam from over the ages and realized that dozens of Renaissance painters had not considered it either, because smack dab next to Adams rib was residual evidence of his umbilical cord leading to a larger Great Mystery. 

Friday, January 23, 2015





With all the importance being placed on under-inflated footballs, I wondered 
about a few simple questions: 
 
1. Did NFL officials measure the temperature and barometric pressure in the room 
where the balls were originally tested before the game? 
2. How does that compare to the field conditions where the game was played and 
how much did those weather conditions change during the course of the game? 
3. After the game was finished, how long was it before NFL officials checked the 
air pressure again? And did they check the balls in the same room, or in another 
room with different climate conditions? 
4. How often does the NFL check footballs after games and how often does the air 
pressure drop in footballs according to their meticulous records? And do they 
account for changes in barometric pressure between the times when the balls are 
tested? 

Wednesday, December 03, 2014

In a fast society slow emotions become extinct. A thinking mind cannot feel.
Emotion is what we experience during gaps in our thinking.

If there are no gaps there is no emotion.

Today people are thinking all the time and are mistaking thought (words/ language) for emotion.




When society switches-over from physical work (agriculture) to mental work (scientific/ industrial/ financial/ fast visuals/ fast words ) the speed of thinking keeps on accelerating and the gaps between thinking go on decreasing.

There comes a time when there are almost no gaps.

People become incapable of experiencing/ tolerating gaps.

Emotion ends.

Man becomes machine.





A society that speeds up mentally experiences every mental slowing-down as Depression / Anxiety.

A ( travelling )society that speeds up physically experiences every physical slowing-down as Depression / Anxiety.

A society that entertains itself daily experiences every non-entertaining moment as Depression / Anxiety.









FAST VISUALS /WORDS MAKE SLOW EMOTIONS EXTINCT.
SCIENTIFIC /INDUSTRIAL /FINANCIAL THINKING DESTROYS EMOTIONAL CIRCUITS.


THIS IS AN APPEAL FOR HELP.

I have been trying to prove some co-relations in a laboratory. If the members of this association can help in getting the following experiment conducted somewhere then please let me know.

( My background is given in the first letter ( letter No. 1 ) under the topic ã Correspondence with neuroscientists ã on the website : www.netshooter.com/emotion )




A FAST (LARGE) SOCIETY CANNOT FEEL PAIN / REMORSE / EMPATHY.

A FAST (LARGE) SOCIETY WILL ALWAYS BE CRUEL TO ANIMALS/ TREES/ AIR/ WATER/ LAND AND TO ITSELF.




I have proposed the following experiment on emotion and am trying to find a neuroscience/psychophysiology/bio-chemistry laboratory where it could be conducted.


There is a link between visual / verbal speed ( in perception, memory, imagery ) and the bio-chemical state of the brain and the body.

Emotion can intensify / sustain only when visual and verbal processing associated with the emotion slows down ( stops / freezes ).

The degree of difficulty of an emotion depends upon the degree of freezing (of visuals and words ) required to intensify and sustain that particular emotion.

Experiment:

Subjects (preferably actors specialising in tragedy / tragic roles ) will be asked to watch a silent video film showing any of the following:-

  1. Human suffering.
  2. Animal suffering.
  3. Suffering ( Destruction ) of Air / Water / Land / Trees.
Subjects will be asked to intensify and sustain the subjective feeling of empathy for the sufferer.
Their brains shall be scanned by Brain Imaging Machines ( PET / FMRI ).

The chemical change associated with the emotion in the brain ( and the rest of the body ) would be measured by appropriate methods.

The silent video film will be shown at different speeds :

  1. 125% of actual speed.
  2. Actual/real speed.
  3. 75% of actual speed.
  4. 50% of actual speed.
  5. 25% of actual speed.


Results :


  1. Intensity of emotion increases with the decrease in visual speed.
  2. Intensity of emotion is maximum when visual speed is minimum (25% of actual speed)
  3. The amount of chemical change associated with the emotion in the brain ( and rest of the body ) will be found to increase with the decrease in visual speed.
  4. The chemical change is maximum when visual speed is minimum.
  5. The amount of chemical change will increase with the decrease in breathing rate. Breathing becomes so slow and non-rhythmic that it stops for some time at the inhalation/ exhalation stages.

for some time at the inhalation/ exhalation stages.


In the 2nd stage of experiment we shall replace the silent video film with a Narrator ( Audio only ) and repeat the procedure thereby establishing the link between intensity of emotion and verbal speed.

Kindly share this message with people who could help in getting the experiment conducted in a Neuroscience / psychophysiology/ bio-chemistry laboratory.


Yours Sincerely,
Sushil Yadav
Delhi, India
www.netshooter.com/emotion


Please note:
  1. If the co-relation is wrong it will be proved wrong experimentallyand the matter will end there.
  2. A THINKING MIND CANNOT INTENSIFY / SUSTAIN ANY EMOTION.
    While this statement is generally true for all emotions, it is particularly true for all painful emotions.
  3. Empathy = Sadness + Worry ( for the suffering of others )
    It will be found that empathy activates the same parts of the brain (neural circuits ) which are activated by sadness and worry. The chemical changes in the brain and the rest of the body are also the same.

    Sadness and worry ( for the suffering of others ) are emotions of the highest level.
  4. In a society in which visual ( verbal ) speed and breathing- rates are fast pain / remorse / empathy cannot be experienced. It is impossible.
IN A FAST SOCIETY SLOW EMOTIONS BECOME EXTINCT.


PROOF.
Proof of the link between pain and slow visuals / words :-

In the last century man has made thousands of movies / films on various themes / subjects. Whenever pain / tragedy is shown in any film the visuals ( scenes ) and words ( dialogues ) are always slowed down. In many films tragedy is shown in slow motion. At the most intense moment of pain the films almost become static / stationary.

Tragedy-films provide direct proof / evidence of the link between pain and slowness.
Pain can intensify / sustain only when visual ( and verbal ) speed slows down( stops/ freezes).



CHANGE IN VISUAL SPEED OVER THE YEARS

One thousand years ago visuals would change only when man physically moved himself to a new place or when other people ( animals / birds ) and objects ( clouds / water ) physically moved themselves before him.

Today man sits in front of TV / Computer and watches the rapidly changing visuals / audio.

He sits in a vehicle ( car / train / bus ) and as it moves he watches the rapidly changing visuals.

He turns the pages of a book / newspaper / magazine and sees many visuals / text in a short span.

The speed of visuals ( and words ) has increased so much during the last one hundred years that today the human brain has become incapable of focussing on slow visuals /words through perception, memory, imagery.

If we cannot focus on slow visuals / words we cannot experience emotions associated with slow visuals /words.

IN A FAST SOCIETY SLOW EMOTIONS BECOME EXTINCT.



Before the advent of Industrial Revolution Manâs thinking was primarily limited to :

  1. visual processing ( slow visuals )
  2. verbal / language processing ( slow words )
    Today there are many kinds of fast thinking :
  3. visual processing ( fast visuals )
  4. verbal / language processing ( fast words )

    If visual / verbal processing is fast we cannot feel slow emotions. 
  5. Scientific / Technical thinking ( fast )
  6. Industrial thinking ( fast )
  7. Business thinking ( fast )
(3), (4) & (5) ARE ASSOCIATED WITH NUMBERS / SYMBOLS / EQUATIONS / GRAPHS /CIRCUITS / DIAGRAMS / MONEY / ACCOUNTING et 
As long as the mind is doing this kind of thinking it cannot feel any emotion - not an iota of emotion.

In a fast society slow emotions become extinct.
In a thinking ( scientific / industrial ) society emotion itself becomes extinct.

EMOTION IS WHAT REMAINS IN THE MIND WHEN VISUAL /VERBAL PROCESSING SLOWS

DOWN (STOPS/ FREEZES )



There are certain categories of people who feel more emotion (subjective experience ) than others.

If we attempt to understand why (and how ) they feel more emotion we can learn a lot about emotion.

Writers, poets, actors, painters ( and other artists )

WRITERS
Writers do verbal ( and associated visual) processing whole day- every day.
They do slow verbal ( and associated visual) processing every day.
(A novel that we read in 2 hours might have taken 2 years to write. This is also the reason why the reader can never feel the intensity & duration of emotion experienced by the writer )

POETS
Poets do verbal ( and associated visual ) processing whole day- every day. There is more emotion in poetry than in prose.
This happens because there are very few words ( and associated visuals ) in poetry than in any other kind of writing.
There is a very high degree of freezing / slowing down of visuals & words in poetry.

ACTORS
Actors do verbal ( and associated visual ) processing whole day- every day. During shooting / rehearsal they repeat the dialogues ( words ) again and again ( the associated visuals / scenes also get repeated along with the dialogues )

Painters
Painters do visual ( and associated verbal ) processing whole day- every day. They do extremely slow visual processing - The visual on the canvas changes only when the painter adds to what already exists on the canvas.


There are some important points to be noted :

  1. All these people do visual & verbal processing - whole day - every day.
  2. They do slow visual & verbal processing.
  3. They do not do scientific / industrial / business processing whole day - every day.

Most of the city people doing mental work either do this kind of mental processing which is associated with NUMBERS / SYMBOLS/ Equations / Graphs / CIRCUITS / DIAGRAMS / MONEY / ACCOUNTING etc· or they do fast visual ( verbal ) processing whole day - every day.

This kind of thinking ( processing ) has come into existence only during the last 200 years and has destroyed our emotional ability ( circuits )






SELF-ASSESSMENT OF ( SUBJECTIVE ) INTENSITY OF EMOTION IS ALMOST ALWAYS WRONG.

Suppose the highest ( maximum ) intensity of a particular emotion that can be experienced by any human being is 100 units.

Let us suppose the maximum intensity of that particular emotion ever experienced by two people A & B in their entire life is :
A - 100units
B - 20 units

Now suppose A & B are made subjects on a particular day and are asked to feel that particular emotion under experimental conditions ( or outside the laboratory ) and the intensity they actually experience is :

A - 90 units
B - 18 units

If A &B are then asked to indicate the intensity of emotion on a scale of 0 -10 their response is likely to be ;

A - 9
B - 9

Who is right and who is wrong ?
A is right.
B is wrong - B is wrong by a wide margin - B has experienced an intensity of 18 units out of a maximum of 100 units and his correct / actual score should be 1.8 )
Self- assessment ( self rating ) can be accurate only if people have the capacity to experience the highest intensity ( units ) of the particular emotion under study.



In small ( slow ) agriculture based societies of the past because of physical work and slow visual/verbal processing the mind used to experience a state of emotion all the time.

Emotion can intensify / sustain only when visual / verbal processing slows down ( stops / freezes ). In an Industrial (thinking) society because of fast ( visual / verbal / scientific / industrial / business ) thinking people experience very little emotion.

Suppose the maximum intensity of a particular emotion ( for most people ) in a fast society has reduced to 5 units ( from 100 units that people used to experience in earlier /slower societies ).

If such people experience 4 units of emotion they will give themselves a rating /score of 8 on a scale of 0-10 whereas their actual score should be 0.4

IN A FAST SOCIETY SLOW EMOTIONS BECOME EXTINCT.




  1. A thinking species destroys the planet.
  2. Animals lived on earth for billions of years (in very large numbers) without destroying nature.
  3. They did not destroy nature because their thinking / activity was
  4. limited to searching for food for one time only.
  5. Man has existed on earth in large numbers for only a few thousand
  6. years / a few hundred years.
  7. Within this short period Man has destroyed the environment.
  8. This destruction took place because of Manâs thinking.
  9. When man thinks he makes things.
  10. When he makes things he kills animals / trees / air / water / land.
  11. ( Nothing can be made without killing these five elements of nature ).
  12. A thinking species destroys the planet.
There was a time when Man knew nothing about the number of species and millions of species existed.
Today Man knows the names of millions of species and nothing is left of the species.




Man can do the same physical work every day.
Man cannot do the same mental work every day.b

When man used to do physical work ( farming and related activities ) he could do the same repetitive work day after day- generation after generation.

After the Industrial Revolution when man switched-over to mental work he began a never ending process of making new machines / things / products- a process which can only end with the complete destruction of environment ( planet ).

AS LONG AS CITIES EXIST ENVIRONMENT CANNOT BE SAVED.

To save the ( remaining ) environment from destruction man will have to 
return back to physical work ( smaller communities ).

To save the mind from mental diseases man will have to return back to physical work ( smaller communities ).



Environment can be saved only if we stop production of most ( more than 99% ) of the consumer goods we are making today.

ENVIRONMENT CANNOT BE SAVED BY RECYCLING

TRYING TO SAVE THE ENVIRONMENT BY RECYCLING IS LIKE SHOOTING SOMEONE 10,000 TIMES AND THEN TRYING TO SAVE HIM BY TAKING OUT ONE BULLET.
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