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Wednesday, December 30, 2009

500 million smooth landings this decade

It’s remarkable that a Northwest Airlines flight was subject to a Christmas attack; eight years to the day that shoe-bomber Richard Reid bumbled a similar airline assault. Equally noteworthy is the international media scrutiny placed on the uncommon events; while meanwhile few news outlets report on the 500 million airline flights that have taken place in the last ten years, without confrontation of any sort.

Saturday, December 19, 2009

Future Friedman: A holistic center for healing war wounds?

In ancient times, when our warriors returned from epic battles, we nurtured them with special care. We led them to spas at city outskirts and helped them cool down with compassionate concern for long spells, until we determined it was safe for them to return into communities, unlike modern times where we often dump soldiers back onto harsh streets with little or no benefits. Nowadays, many of our country’s valiant veterans are homeless or incarcerated at record levels, while perpetually mired in post-traumatic crises.


As Dennis Kucinich said, “Homelessness and poverty are weapons of mass destruction.”

Men develop with different levels of mettle, but sanity has limitation points for even the bravest of soldiers. In earlier wars, ‘Soldiers Heart’ or ‘Battle Fatigue’ affected many Veterans (and their families). Now Post Traumatic Stress Disorder is the commonly used expression.

A historically safe place soldiers used to convalesce, both physically and psychologically was the Sun Valley Lodge. Many WW II soldiers, who effectively rehabilitated there in the crisp mountain air, became permanently attached to Idaho and remained as helpful contributors for many years within our community.

The good earth where Friedman Airport currently stands makes an ideal spot for another state-of-the-art rehabilitation center, especially when you consider that if the Friedman family recognizes a significantly suitable cause, that they will then consider donating this prime Hailey real estate for that concern, when the airport relocates.

We could transform this airport acreage into something for truly banking on. Besides generous monetary donations from valley benefactors to establish a healing foundation, this is an opportunity to show how rich we are in spirit, by welcoming our recuperating warriors back into the community. To contribute further to their continued recovery, we could thank some of our dedicated veterans for their Herculean efforts by offering them desirable jobs; related with support services for the healing center itself.

Moreover, we could construct hundreds of affordable-housing units on the land, along with worker-retraining facilities for displaced soldiers to reattach to our community. Some will likely rejuvenate with a broader sense of understanding, and develop desires to become healing practitioners themselves. A holistic focused healing center would create bountiful meaningful jobs here, not only for our respected veterans, but also for many others suffering in this economic slump. Already established mentoring organizations such as Sun Valley Adaptive Sports, The Advocates and the College of Southern Idaho’s nursing center could tie in well with the noble goal of rehabilitating war veterans.

The relocated airport itself would even benefit, by becoming a bustling transport center for steady streams of patients, visitors, hospital personnel and supplies.

The hospital could feature Posttraumatic stress disorder therapies like recently advanced Somatic Experiencing, MDMA and Propranolol treatments, as well as other proven curative methods, both ancient and new. A holistic equine center could help our severely traumatized reconnect with the community through nature.

With the sunny climate, fresh air and clean water inherent to this valley, enhanced by the numerous enlightened compassionate people who flourish here, our community could set a new standard for positive rehabilitation and improve on some of the shortcomings that have plagued poor Walter Reed Veteran’s hospital.

The new Airport Advisory commission should consider these ideas and similar ones, such as Tom Iselin’s grand idea for a Paralympics Center to see if they hold enough water to transform soldier’s widow tears into flowing fountains fronting a first class ‘Friedman Memorial Trauma-Stren Conversion Center.’

After all, what should be more important than proper treatment and compassionate care for our wounded warriors who have patriotically served, even if we fought some of these battles for misguided reasons?


Therefore, let us tie some of our yellow ribbons around the old Friedman Airport and welcome these soldiers back into our community in the best way possible.

Friday, December 18, 2009

Future Friedman: A holistic center for healing war wounds?

revised suggestion

In ancient times, we nurtured our warriors with special care when they returned from epic battles. We led them to spas at city outskirts and helped them cool down with compassionate care for long spells, until we determined it was safe for them to return into communities, unlike modern times where we often dump soldiers back onto harsh streets with little or no benefits. Nowadays, many of our country’s valiant veterans are homeless or incarcerated at record levels, while perpetually mired in post-traumatic crises.

As Dennis Kucinich said, “Homelessness and poverty are weapons of mass destruction.”

Men develop with different levels of mettle, but sanity has limitation points for even the bravest of soldiers. In earlier wars, ‘Soldiers Heart’ or ‘Battle Fatigue’ affected many Veterans (and their families). Now Post Traumatic Stress Disorder is the commonly used expression.

A historically safe place soldiers used to convalesce, both physically and psychologically was the Sun Valley Lodge. Many WW II soldiers, who effectively rehabilitated there in the crisp mountain air, became permanently attached to Idaho and some remained, as helpful contributors for many years within our community.

The good earth where Friedman Airport currently resides makes a perfect spot for another state-of-the-art rehabilitation center, especially when you consider that if the Friedman family recognizes a significantly suitable cause, that they will then consider donating this prime Hailey Real Estate for that concern, when the airport relocates.

We could transform this airport acreage into something for truly banking on. Besides generous monetary donations from valley benefactors to establish a healing foundation, this is an opportunity to show how rich we are in spirit, by welcoming our recuperating warriors back into the community. To contribute to their continued recovery, we could thank some of our dedicated veterans for their Herculean efforts by offering them desirable jobs; related with support services for the healing center itself.

Moreover, we could construct hundreds of affordable-housing units on the land, along with worker-retraining facilities for displaced soldiers to reattach to our community. Some will likely rejuvenate with a broader sense of understanding, and develop desires to become healing practitioners themselves. A holistic focused healing center would create bountiful meaningful jobs here, not only for our respected veterans, but also for many others suffering in this economic slump. Already established mentoring organizations such as Sun Valley Adaptive Sports, The Advocates and the College of Southern Idaho’s nursing center could tie in well with the goal of rehabilitating war veterans.

The relocated airport itself could even benefit, by becoming a bustling transport center for steady streams of patients, visitors, hospital personnel and supplies.

The hospital could feature Posttraumatic stress disorder therapies like recently advanced Somatic Experiencing, MDMA and Propranolol treatments, as well as other proven curative methods, both ancient and new. A holistic equine center could help our severely traumatized reconnect with the community through nature.

With the sunny climate, fresh air and clean water inherent to this valley, enhanced by the numerous enlightened compassionate people who flourish here, our community could set a new standard for positive rehabilitation and improve on some of the shortcomings that have plagued Walter Reed Veteran’s hospital.

The new Airport Advisory commission should consider these ideas and similar ones, such as Tom Iselin’s grand idea for a Paralympics Center to see if they hold enough water to transform soldier’s widow tears into flowing fountains fronting a first class ‘Friedman Memorial Trauma-Stren Conversion Center.’

After all, what should be more important than proper treatment and compassionate care for our wounded warriors who have patriotically served, even if we fought some of these battles for misguided reasons?

Tuesday, December 15, 2009

Future Friedman: A holistic center for healing war wounds?

In ancient times, we nurtured our warriors with special care when they returned from epic battles. We led them to spas at city outskirts and helped them cool down with compassionate care for long spells, until we determined it was safe for them to return into communities, unlike modern times where we often dump soldiers back onto harsh streets with little or no benefits. Nowadays, many of our country’s valiant veterans are homeless or incarcerated at record levels, while perpetually mired in post-traumatic crises.

As Dennis Kucinich said, “Homelessness and poverty are weapons of mass destruction.”

Men develop with different levels of mettle, but sanity has limitation points for even the bravest of soldiers. In earlier wars, ‘Soldiers Heart’ or ‘Battle Fatigue’ affected many Veterans (and their families). Now Post Traumatic Stress Disorder is the commonly used expression.

A historically safe place soldiers used to convalesce, both physically and psychologically was the Sun Valley Lodge. Many WW II soldiers, who effectively rehabilitated there in the crisp mountain air, became permanently attached to Idaho and some remained, as helpful contributors for many years within our community.

The good earth where Friedman Airport currently stands makes a perfect spot for another state-of-the-art rehabilitation center, especially when you consider that if the Friedman family recognizes a significantly suitable cause, that they will then consider donating this prime Hailey Real Estate for that concern, when the airport relocates.

We could transform this airport acreage into something for truly banking on. Besides generous monetary donations from valley benefactors to establish a healing foundation, this is an opportunity to show how rich we are in spirit, by welcoming our recuperating warriors back into the community. To contribute to their continued recovery, we could thank some of our dedicated veterans for their Herculean efforts by offering them desirable jobs; related with support services for the healing center itself.

Moreover, we could construct hundreds of affordable-housing units on the land, along with worker-retraining facilities for displaced soldiers to reattach to our community. Some will likely rejuvenate with a broader sense of understanding, and develop desires to become healing practitioners themselves. A holistic focused center could create bountiful meaningful jobs here, not only for our respected veterans, but also for many others suffering in this economic slump. Already established mentoring organizations such as Sun Valley Adaptive Sports and The Advocates could tie in with such a permanent wellness festival.

Perhaps an appreciative owner of one of the locally underutilized hot springs could pipe healing waters into such a splendiferous spa, with government stepping in to fund construction logistics of the supportive donation.

The relocated airport itself could even benefit, by becoming a bustling transport center for steady streams of patients, visitors, hospital personnel and supplies.

The hospital could feature Posttraumatic stress disorder therapies like recently advanced Somatic Experiencing, MDMA and Propranolol treatments, as well as other proven curative methods, both ancient and new. A holistic equine center could help severely traumatized reconnect with the community through nature.

With the sunny climate, fresh air and clean water inherent to this valley, enhanced by the numerous enlightened compassionate people who flourish here, our community could set a new standard for positive rehabilitation and improve on some of the shortcomings plaguing Walter Reed Veteran’s hospital.

The new Airport Advisory board should consider this idea or similar ones, such as Tom Iselin’s grand idea for a Paralympics Center to see if they hold enough water to transform soldier’s widow tears into flowing fountains fronting a first class ‘Friedman Memorial Trauma-Stren Conversion Center.’

After all, what should be more important than proper treatment and compassionate care for our wounded warriors who have patriotically served, even if we fought some of these battles for misguided reasons?

Monday, December 14, 2009

NERC and cyber security

Mr. Banholzer:

Thank you for your question to the Idaho Public Utilities Commission regarding the Smart Grid and cyber security.

The Commission is well aware of issues regarding cyber security and makes sure that Idaho and its regulated utilities are actively involved in the national effort to work to protect our transmission and distributions systems from cyber attack.

Idaho is part or a regional Electric Reliability Organization (ERO) and our commission as well as utilities are part of the North American Electric Reliability Corporation (NERC). Reliability and well as security for transmission and distribution have been ongoing concerns for a number of years, and particularly so since 9-11. Our utilities must meet basic ERO and NERC standards or face stiff financial penalties for not doing so. And, obviously, it is in utilities’ self-interest to ensure their systems are reliable and secure.

The vendors in charge of installing Idaho Power’s smart grid are certified in their respective areas of expertise and have had considerable experience installing automated metering infrastructure nationwide. In fact, a major advantage of smart-grid technology will be its ability to detect outages and “troubleshoot” other areas of concerns that, overall, will make the transmission and distribution system more reliable and safe than it is without automated metering infrastructure.

Since the issuance of FERC Order 706 addressing cyber security standards, state commissioners as well as the national organizations and utilities have been working together to implement the standards. I’m including some links to press releases announcing updated cyber security standards. From these press releases and the Web sites (below) for NERC and FERC you can find more information than you probably want on what is being done in these areas.

Thanks again for writing and please forgive my delay in responding. If you have further questions, please do not hesitate to contact me.

Gene Fadness
Executive Assistant
Idaho Public Utilities Commission
gene.fadness@puc.idaho.gov
208.334.0339

May 6 press release announcing NERC standards:

http://www.nerc.com/news_pr.php?npr=308

June 17 press release re: Updated developments in cyber security:

http://www.nerc.com/news_pr.php?npr=336

FERC press release re: cyber security standards:

http://www.ferc.gov/news/news-releases/2008/2008-1/01-17-08-E-2.asp

NERC website: www.nerc.com

FERC website: www.ferc.gov

Friday, December 11, 2009




Elephantaucity



In this new era of electronic mail, it’s not often that I receive greeting cards; however, two months ago, I received a heartfelt condolence card from an out of town friend, offering support, when my good friend Mary Anne passed on. The card chosen had on its cover, a photo of a little girl pushing a Ginormous elephant onto a cart, which symbolized the small level of support my friend felt she was offering, since she was unable to be here in person.



A month later, I received another card in the mail. This one was a thank you for helping another friend move some large furniture around her house and featured an elephant on the cover. This friend included the notation: “No kidding, you’re my biggest friend.” I set the second card atop the refrigerator, by the other elephant card, thought it was a nice coincidence, and pointed it out to a few friends that came by.



Then a few days ago, my Aunt Jane sent me a classic care package for my birthday.[i] Aunt Jane is a nature lover and vibrant cloud-watcher and for years, has sent out hand-painted cards as seasonal gifts. Well, lo & behold, among the thoughtful items she included was a personalized water coloring of an elephant grazing!



This third friendly-looking elephant left me a little stunned, and soon the wild synchronicity prompted me to tread softly over to the world of animal totems:



http://www.sayahda.com/cyc2.html



Here the twelfth totem says:


The Elephant


“Throughout history elephants have been prized for their power and strength. They are extremely intelligence and honored by many cultures. Elephants are the largest land animals and among the longest lived, with life spans of 60 years or more. According to Buddhist tradition, the Buddha chose the form of a white elephant as one of his many incarnations and the rare appearance of a white elephant is still heralded as a manifestation of the gods. The Hindu god Ganesh, the remover of obstacles, is depicted with the head of an elephant.


Despite their great weight, elephants walk almost noiselessly. Their stride is exceptionally graceful and rhythmic. Their hearing, smell, taste and touch is acute. This compensates for their poor eyesight. Their eyes are small in relation to the enormous head, which can only turn slightly from side to side. This limited movement results in restricted side vision. Those with this medicine feel things deeply and respond to those feelings from a place of inner knowing. Because their peripheral vision is limited, they have a tendency to look straight ahead and not always see what is around them. Learning to shift ones focus to encompass the whole is helpful.


Loyal and affectionate elephants are willing to risk their life for the sake of others in a family group. Wild elephants have been known to grieve and even shed tears over the death of a family member. They have excellent memories and when mistreated they often seek revenge.


Elephants have four teeth, all molars. The first pair of molars is located toward the front of the mouth. When they wear down, they drop out and the two molars in the back shift forward. Two new molars emerge in the back of the mouth to replace those that have moved forward. Elephants replace back molars six times throughout their life. When the last set wears out, they are unable to chew and die of starvation.


Teeth have great symbolism. They are considered receivers and transmitters of energy linked by connecting paths throughout the astral body. Because the elephant is highly intelligent, those with this totem make excellent researchers and alternative scientists. The complex study of numbers, energy meridians and the tie in between the physical brain, the teeth locations, and the major and minor head chakras is fascinating as well as beneficial.


Elephant tusks point backwards, are used as weapons and for digging edible roots. From a spiritual point of view, this suggests an ability to uncover the secrets left behind you and bring them to the consciousness for evaluation and healing.


These beautiful creatures hold the teachings of compassion, loyalty, strength, intelligence, discernment and power to name a few. If this is your medicine, these virtues are a part of your natural character. By applying these gifts in your life soul evolution is achieved.”


As I began identifying with this elephant talk, it resonated within; that the best part of my 50th birthday (12/12) is that close friends have sent me this synchronicity - practically on a silver platter - and the fact that I could recognize their big gifts so readily.








[i] Aunt Jane must have presumed that her care package would arrive late, way out here in Idaho, but it actually came a few days early, back when I was telling friends, “Yes, I’m still in my mid-to-late forties.”

Tuesday, December 08, 2009

How powerful is Television?

(From Slate Magazine) Cornell University researchers are reporting what appears to be a statistically significant relationship between autism rates and television watching by children under the age of three.”

I’m not an expert on autism, but recently I took a refresher psychology class at The College of Southern Idaho. When we arrived at the chapter on dreams, something reminded me of the textbook from my previous psyche class, three decades ago. Back then, a statement claimed that 95 percent of us Americans dream in black and white. That study was from the early 60's, an era when we watched over 90 percent of TV shows through black and white sets.

The textbook from my recent CSI class, posited precisely the opposite: that 95 percent of us now dream in living color! What was there to explain for this grand shift? Is there a correlation between the tones of Americans dreams and the types of TV’s they own?

This made me wonder: Is television high-definition hypnotism, a force so powerful, that not only does it connect as a crucial cause of autism, when used as a primary babysitter; but also that its programming transforms our dream colors?